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17 September, 2020 – The McIlvanney Prize winner is revealed

The 2020 McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Fiction winner was revealed to be debut author Francine Toon, for Pine. Judges Karen Robinson (Times Crime Club) and James Crawford (author, TV presenter and chairman of Publishing Scotland) were chaired by writer and broadcaster Stuart Cosgrove. He described Toon’s book as “an extraordinary novel which stood out because of the sheer quality of the writing and the dark brooding atmosphere of the remote rural Scottish village in which it is set. The book merges the supernatural with real crime in a very memorable way and brings an exciting new talent to Scottish crime writing.”

The Bloody Scotland Prize for Debut Novel of the Year was Deborah Masson with Hold Your Tongue. The prize was judged by Lin Anderson, author and co-founder of Bloody Scotland, Ewan Wilson from Waterstones and Kenny Tweedale from sponsors the Glencairn Glass. The judges described Hold Your Tongue as “a well written, fast paced and gritty thriller with a strong female protagonist, who will stop at nothing to find the killer”.

The shortlist for the McIlvanney Prize 2020 was: Ambrose Parry, The Art Of Dying (Canongate); Doug Johnstone, A Dark Matter (Orenda); Francine Toon, Pine (Doubleday/Transworld); Andrew James Greig, Whirligig (Fledgling Press).
The shortlist for the Bloody Scotland Debut Prize 2020 were: Deborah Masson, Hold Your Tongue (Corgi/Transworld); Stephen O’Rourke, The Crown Agent (Sandstone); Marion Todd, See Them Run (Canelo); Francine Toon, Pine (Doubleday/Transworld).

The McIlvanney Prize is awarded annually in memory of novelist William McIlvanney, known as “The Godfather of Tartan Noir”, and recognises excellence in Scottish crime writing. The winner receives a prize of £1,000, a Glencairn crystal decanter and nationwide promotion in Waterstones stores. The Bloody Scotland Debut Prize winner will receive £500 and a Glencairn Star trophy. The Glencairn Glass is sponsoring both prizes for the first time this year. Culture & Business Fund Scotland have generously given matched funding.

1 September, 2020 – The McIlvanney Prize shortlist is announced

Today Bloody Scotland unveils the shortlisted authors in contention for the 2020 McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Book of the Year, sponsored by the Glencairn Glass.

The shortlist for the 2020 McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Book of the Year:
Andrew James Greig, Whirligig (Fledgling)
Doug Johnstone, A Dark Matter (Orenda)
Ambrose Parry, The Art of Dying (Canongate)
Francine Toon, Pine (Doubleday)

Previous winners include Manda Scott with A Treachery Of Spies in 2019 (she shared the prize with fellow finalists Doug Johnstone, Denise Mina and Ambrose Parry), Liam McIlvanney, Chris Brookmyre, Craig Russell and Peter May.

The judges are Stuart Cosgrove, writer, broadcaster and former senior executive at Channel 4; James Crawford, chairman of Publishing Scotland and presenter of BBC series Scotland from the Sky, and Karen Robinson, editor of the Times Crime Club. The winner will be revealed on 18 September. The festival was due to take place in Stirling from 18-20 September, but due to the coronavirus crisis it will now take place online.

The McIlvanney Prize is awarded annually in memory of novelist William McIlvanney, known as “The Godfather of Tartan Noir”, and recognises excellence in Scottish crime writing. The winner receives a prize of £1,000, a Glencairn crystal decanter and nationwide promotion in Waterstones stores. The Bloody Scotland Debut Prize winner will receive £500 and a Glencairn Star trophy. The Glencairn Glass is sponsoring both prizes for the first time this year. Culture & Business Fund Scotland have generously given matched funding.

The longlist was:
Lin Anderson, Time for the Dead (Macmillan)
Lisa Gray, Bad Memory (Thomas & Mercer)
Andrew James Greig, Whirligig (Fledgling)
Doug Johnstone, A Dark Matter (Orenda)
Val McDermid, How the Dead Speak (Little, Brown)
Ben McPherson, The Island (HarperCollins)
James Oswald, Bury Them Deep (Headline)
Ambrose Parry, The Art of Dying (Canongate)
Mary Paulson-Ellis, The Inheritance of Solomon Farthing (Mantle)
Caro Ramsay, The Red, Red Snow (Severn House)
Craig Robertson, Watch Him Die (Simon & Schuster)
Francine Toon, Pine (Doubleday)

Keep up to date with the festival here: Twitter: @BloodyScotland #BloodyScotland Facebook: www.facebook.com/bloodyscotland/ Website: www.bloodyscotland.com/

7 August, 2020 – CWA Daggers shortlists announced

The Crime Writers Association Daggers are some of the most prestigious awards in the genre, and have been celebrating excellence for more than half a century. The shortlist includes previous nominees, debut appearances, high-profile names and less well-known writers across a host of categories, judged by industry professionals. The winners will be announced on 22 October at an event live online, hosted by Barry Forshaw.

GOLD DAGGER (for crime novel)
Claire Askew: What You Pay For (Hodder & Stoughton)
Lou Berney: November Road (Harper Fiction)
John Fairfax: Forced Confessions (Little, Brown)
Mick Herron: Joe Country (John Murray)
Abir Mukherjee: Death in the East (Harvill Secker)
Michael Robotham: Good Girl, Bad Girl (Sphere)

IAN FLEMING STEEL DAGGER (for thrillers)
Lou Berney: November Road (Harper Fiction)
Tom Chatfield: This is Gomorrah (Hodder & Stoughton)
AA Dhand: One Way Out (Bantam Press)
Eva Dolan: Between Two Evils (Raven Books)
David Koepp: Cold Storage (HQ)
Alex North: The Whisper Man (Michael Joseph)

JOHN CREASEY (NEW BLOOD) DAGGER (for published debuts)
Steph Cha: Your House Will Pay (Faber & Faber)
Samantha Downing: My Lovely Wife (Michael Joseph)
Philippa East: Little White Lies (HQ)
Robin Morgan-Bentley: The Wreckage (Trapeze)
Trevor Wood: The Man on the Street (Quercus Fiction)

SAPERE BOOKS HISTORICAL DAGGER
Alis Hawkins: In Two Minds (The Dome Press)
Philip Kerr: Metropolis (Quercus Fiction)
SG MacLean: The Bear Pit (Quercus Fiction)
Abir Mukherjee: Death in the East (Harvill Secker)
Alex Reeve: The Anarchists’ Club (Raven Books)
Ovidia Yu: The Paper Bark Tree Mystery (Constable)

CRIME FICTION IN TRANSLATION DAGGER
Marion Brunet: Summer of Reckoning, trans Katherine Gregor (Bitter Lemon Press)
Hannelore Cayre: The Godmother, trans Stephanie Smee (Old Street Publishing)
K Ferrari: Like Flies from Afar, trans Adrian Nathan West (Canongate Books)
Jorge Galán: November, trans Jason Wilson (Constable)
Sergio Olguín: The Fragility of Bodies, trans Miranda France (Bitter Lemon Press)
Antti Tuomainen: Little Siberia, trans David Hackston (Orenda Books)

SHORT STORY DAGGER
Jeffery Deaver: The Bully in Exit Wounds, ed Paul B Kane & Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
Paul Finch: The New Lad in Exit Wounds, ed Paul B Kane & Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
Christopher Fowler: The Washing in Invisible Blood, ed Maxim Jakubowski (Titan Books)
Lauren Henderson: #Me Too in Invisible Blood, ed Maxim Jakubowski (Titan Books)
Louise Jensen: The Recipe in Exit Wounds, ed Paul B Kane & Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
Syd Moore: Easily Made in 12 Strange Days of Christmas (Point Blank Press)

ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION
Casey Cep: Furious Hours (William Heinemann)
Peter Everett: Corrupt Bodies (Icon Books)
Caroline Goode: Honour: Achieving Justice for Banaz Mahmod (Oneworld Publications)
Sean O’Connor: The Fatal Passion of Alma Rattenbury (Simon & Schuster)
Adam Sisman: The Professor and the Parson: A Story of Desire, Deceit and Defrocking (Profile Books)
Susannah Stapleton: The Adventures of Maud West, Lady Detective (Picador)

DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY
Christopher Brookmyre
Jane Casey
Alex Gray
Quintin Jardine
The Dagger in the Library is voted on exclusively by librarians, the author being chosen for a body of work and support of libraries

DEBUT DAGGER (for unknown, uncontracted writers)
Anna Caig: The Spae-Wife
Leanne Fry: Whipstick
Kim Hays: Pesticide
Nicholas Morrish: Emergency Drill
Josephine Moulds: Revolution Never Lies
Michael Munro: Bitter Lake

PUBLISHERS’ DAGGER
Bitter Lemon Press
Harvill Secker
Head of Zeus
HQ
Michael Joseph
Orenda Books
Raven Books
Severn House

As previously announced, this year’s recipient of the Diamond Dagger – for sustained excellence and making a significant contribution to the genre – is Martin Edwards.

23 July, 2020 – Theakstons winner announced

The winner of the 16th Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year is… Adrian McKinty for The Chain. Chosen from a longlist of 18 titles by a combination of votes from the public and the prize academy, the winner was announced by Simon Theakston during an online event after the shortlistees were interviewed by Mark Lawson. There may not be a real-life festival this year, so we can’t all celebrate in the famous tent outside the Old Swan Hotel, but the winner still receives their £3,000 and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier.

You can watch Mark Lawson chat with the shortlistees before revealing the winner here.

The award is produced and curated by arts charity Harrogate International Festivals and is presented in partnership with T&R Theakston Ltd, WHSmith and the Express. The longlist was selected by an academy of crime writing authors, agents, editors, reviewers, members of the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival programming committee, and representatives from T&R Theakston Ltd, the Express, and WHSmith.

The shortlist was:

  • My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (Atlantic Books)
  • Worst Case Scenario by Helen Fitzgerald (Orenda Books)
  • The Lost Man by Jane Harper (Little, Brown Book Group, Little, Brown)
  • Joe Country by Mick Herron (John Murray Press)
  • The Chain by Adrian McKinty (Orion Publishing Group, Orion Fiction)
  • Smoke and Ashes by Abir Mukherjee (Vintage, Harvill Secker)

29 June, 2020 – British Book Awards presented

The Bookseller British Book Awards, aka The Nibbies, moved online this year like so many other events, but still celebrated books and publishing with a string of awards handed out. From a strong crime & thriller shortlist, Oyinkan Braithwaite’s darkly comic My Sister The Serial Killer took home the prize, adding to a series of wins and nominations it has collected since publication (Braithwaite was also part of Val McDermid’s New Blood panel at Harrogate last year). You can read my review of the novel over here. Read more about the winners online at: www.thebookseller.com/british-book-awards Twitter: @thebookseller

23 June, 2020 – Bloody Scotland reveals McIlvanney Prize longlist

Today Bloody Scotland unveils the longlisted authors in contention for the 2020 McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Book of the Year, and the shortlist for the Bloody Scotland Debut Prize. One author appears on both lists. This year both awards are sponsored by the Glencairn Glass.

The shortlist for the second Bloody Scotland Debut Prize are: Deborah Masson for Hold Your Tongue (Transworld); Stephen O’Rourke for The Crown Agent (Sandstone); Marion Todd for See Them Run (Canelo) and Francine Toon for Pine (Doubleday), who also makes the McIlvanney Prize longlist.

The longlist for the 2020 McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Book of the Year includes several previous nominees and covers a mix of large and small publishers:
Lin Anderson, Time for the Dead (Macmillan)
Lisa Gray, Bad Memory (Thomas & Mercer)
Andrew James Greig, Whirligig (Fledgling)
Doug Johnstone, A Dark Matter (Orenda)
Val McDermid, How the Dead Speak (Little, Brown)
Ben McPherson, The Island (HarperCollins)
James Oswald, Bury Them Deep (Headline)
Ambrose Parry, The Art of Dying (Canongate)
Mary Paulson-Ellis, The Inheritance of Solomon Farthing (Mantle)
Caro Ramsay, The Red, Red Snow (Severn House)
Craig Robertson, Watch Him Die (Simon & Schuster)
Francine Toon, Pine (Doubleday)

The judges – Stuart Cosgrove, writer, broadcaster and former senior executive at Channel 4; James Crawford, chairman of Publishing Scotland and presenter of BBC series Scotland from the Sky, and Karen Robinson, editor of the Times Crime Club – will select the McIlvanney Prize shortlist, to be revealed on 1 September, and the overall winner. The winner of the debut prize will be selected by a panel including Lin Anderson, author and a co-founder of Bloody Scotland, and representatives from Waterstones and Glencairn Crystal. The winners of both awards will be revealed on 18 September.

The authors shortlisted for the Debut Prize will also collaborate on a short story in the run-up to the Bloody Scotland festival, to be co-ordinated by author and board member, Gordon Brown (aka Morgan Cry), in association with the Glencairn Glass. The festival was due to take place in Stirling from 18-20 September, but due to the coronavirus crisis it will now take place online.

Keep up to date with the festival here: Twitter: @BloodyScotland #BloodyScotland Facebook: www.facebook.com/bloodyscotland/ Website: www.bloodyscotland.com/

31 May, 2020 – Theakstons shortlist announced

The shortlist for the 16th Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year has been announced, taking the reader on an international crime spree from New York to Calcutta, London to Lagos via Glasgow and the Australian outback. Chosen from a longlist of 18 titles by a combination of public vote and the prize Academy, the novels in contention showcase exceptional variety and originality, including spy espionage, historical crime, gallows humour, outback noir and serial killing siblings.

Marking a meteoric rise since being selected by Val McDermid for the 2019 Festival’s New Blood panel, Oyinkan Braithwaite makes the shortlist with the Booker-nominated My Sister, the Serial Killer (Atlantic Books). Based in Nigeria, Braithwaite is the only debut author in contention, and one of the youngest ever to be shortlisted.

The remaining five authors on the shortlist are all previous contenders. The legendary Mick Herron has picked up a fifth nomination with Joe Country (John Murray Press), the latest in his espionage masterclass Slough House series, which is currently being adapted for TV with Gary Oldman as Jackson Lamb. Scottish-Bengali author Abir Mukherjee is listed for Smoke & Ashes (Vintage, Harvill Secker), the third in the Wyndham & Banerjee series set in Raj-era India.

Making it through to the shortlist for the first time is Australian (and now adopted Glaswegian) Helen Fitzgerald for Worst Case Scenario (Orenda Books), which marks her first appearance on the Theakston list since The Cry, adapted into a major BBC drama starting Jenna Colman, was longlisted in 2013. Belfast’s Adrian McKinty, creator of the Sean Duffy series set in his home city, is listed for The Chain (Orion Fiction), a terrifying thriller that sees parents forced to kidnap children to save their own, and for which Paramount Pictures has acquired the screen rights in a seven-figure film deal.

The final title on the shortlist is The Lost Man (Little, Brown) by former journalist Jane Harper, who was previously longlisted for her debut The Dry in 2018. The film adaption of that earlier novel, starring Eric Bana, is due to be released this year.

The winner would normally be crowned on the opening evening of the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival, but as the festival has sadly been cancelled. this year, the winner will be revealed at a virtual awards ceremony on 23 July. They will receive £3,000, and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier.

The award is produced and curated by arts charity Harrogate International Festivals and is presented in partnership with T&R Theakston Ltd, WHSmith and the Express. The longlist was selected by an academy of crime writing authors, agents, editors, reviewers, members of the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival programming committee, and representatives from T&R Theakston Ltd, the Express, and WHSmith.

15 May, 2020 – Theakstons longlist announced

Now in its 16th year, the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year, presented by Harrogate International Festivals, reveals its longlist of 18 titles in contention for the 2020 award. A record number of submissions were received, and the longlist includes four former winners – Denise Mina, Chris Brookmyre, Val McDermid and Lee Child – a Booker Prize contender, and three debut authors taking the genre by storm, Oyinkan Braithwaite, Harriet Tyce and Laura Shepherd-Robinson.

The full longlist for the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year 2020 is:

  • My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (Atlantic Books)
  • Fallen Angel by Chris Brookmyre (Little, Brown Book Group, Abacus)
  • Nothing Important Happened Today by Will Carver (Orenda Books)
  • Cruel Acts by Jane Casey (HarperCollins, Harper Fiction)
  • Blue Moon by Lee Child (Transworld, Bantam)
  • The Long Call by Ann Cleeves (Pan Macmillan, Macmillan/Pan)
  • Red Snow by Will Dean (Oneworld, Point Blank)
  • Platform Seven by Louise Doughty (Faber & Faber)
  • Worst Case Scenario by Helen Fitzgerald (Orenda Books)
  • The Lost Man by Jane Harper (Little, Brown Book Group, Little, Brown)
  • Joe Country by Mick Herron (John Murray Press)
  • How the Dead Speak by Val McDermid (Little, Brown Book Group, Little, Brown)
  • The Chain by Adrian McKinty (Orion Publishing Group, Orion Fiction)
  • Conviction by Denise Mina (VINTAGE, Harvill Secker)
  • Smoke and Ashes by Abir Mukherjee (VINTAGE, Harvill Secker)
  • The Whisper Man by Alex North (Penguin Random House, Michael Joseph)
  • Blood & Sugar by Laura Shepherd-Robinson (Pan Macmillan, Mantle/Pan)
  • Blood Orange by Harriet Tyce  (Headline Publishing Group, Wildfire)

The winner will be revealed at a virtual awards ceremony on 23 July. They will receive £3,000, and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier.

15 April, 2020 – Bloody Scotland announces new sponsor for McIlvanney Prize

Bloody Scotland has confirmed that the annual McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Book of the Year, and the Bloody Scotland Debut Prize, will both have a new sponsor for 2020, the Glencairn Glass. Award-winning Scottish family business Glencairn Crystal, creators of the Glencairn Glass, has always produced the decanter given to the winner of the McIlvanney Prize, so it was a natural partnership for them to come on board as sponsors of the prizes in their entirety.

More than 60 entries have been received for the 2020 award. The longlist will be announced on 23 June, after which a panel of judges including Karen Robinson, editor of the Times Crime Club; James Crawford, chairman of Publishing Scotland and presenter of BBC series Scotland from the Sky, and Stuart Cosgrove, writer, broadcaster and former senior executive at Channel 4, will select the finalists and the overall winner. The winner of the debut prize will be selected by a panel including Lin Anderson, author and a co-founder of Bloody Scotland, and representatives from Waterstones and Glencairn Crystal.

The McIlvanney Prize is awarded annually in memory of novelist William McIlvanney, known as “The Godfather of Tartan Noir”, and recognises excellence in Scottish crime writing. The winner receives a prize of £1,000, a Glencairn crystal decanter and nationwide promotion in Waterstones stores. The Bloody Scotland Debut Prize winner will receive £500 and a Glencairn Star trophy. The shortlists will be announced on 1 September and the winners will be revealed on 18 September.